AW READS

BOOK LOVERS TUNE IN!

Bestsellers, first novels, book club favorites, and award winners are the discussion du jour on AW Reads, the Aspen Words community book club on GrassRoots TV Channel 12 (in Aspen). Join our panels of local literary enthusiasts as they read between the lines of new and notable books during the rotating series of half-hour shows.

SHOW TIMES

Sunday 1pm / Monday 2pm / Tuesday 8:30pm / Wednesday 9am / Friday 12:30pm

AW READS_TheSonThe Son
by Philipp Meyer
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In 1859, Eli McCullough, the 13-year-old son of Texas pioneers, is captured in a brutal Comanche raid on his family’s homestead. First taken as a slave along with his less intrepid brother, Eli assimilates himself into Comanche culture, learning their arts of riding, hunting, and total warfare. When the tribe succumbs to waves of disease and settlers, Eli’s only option is a return to Texas, where his acquired thirsts for freedom and self-determination set a course for his family’s inexorable rise through the industries of cattle and oil. The Son is Philipp Meyer’s epic tale of more than 150 years of money, family, and power, told through the memories of three unforgettable narrators.

Panelists: Mark Billingsley, Jeanne Weinkle, Jeannie Walla

 

AW READS_Stay_Up_With_Me_WebStay Up With Me
by Tom Barbash
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The stories in Tom Barbash’s evocative and often darkly funny collection explore the myriad ways we try to connect to one another and to the sometimes cruel world around us. The newly single mother in ‘The Break’ interferes with her son’s love life over his Christmas vacation from college. The anxious young man in ‘Balloon Night’ persists in hosting his and his wife’s annual watch-the-Macy’s-Thanksgiving-Day-Parade-floats-be-inflated party, while trying to keep the myth of his marriage equally afloat. The young narrator in ‘The Women’ watches his widowed father become the toast of Manhattan’s midlife dating scene, as he struggles to find his own footing. The characters in “Stay Up with Me” find new truths when the old ones have given out or shifted course. Barbash laces his narratives with sharp humor, psychological acuity, and pathos, creating deeply resonant and engaging stories that pierce the heart and linger in the imagination.

Panelists: Carol Peachy, Cathleen Treacy, Ashton Hewitt, Carol Hawk

 

AW READS_Long_Haftime_WalkBilly Flynn’s Long Halftime Walk
by Ben Fountain
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Billy Lynn and his Bravo squad mates have become heroes thanks to an embedded Fox News crew’s footage of their firefight against Iraqi insurgents. During one day of their bizarre Victory Tour, set mostly at a Thanksgiving Day football game at Texas Stadium, they’re wooed by Hollywood producers, smitten by Dallas Cowboy cheerleaders, and share a stage at halftime with Beyonce. Guzzling Jack and Cokes and scuffling with fans, the Bravos are conflicted soldiers. “Okay, so maybe they aren’t the greatest generation,” writes debut author (!) Ben Fountain, who manages a sly feat: giving us a maddening and believable cast of characters who make us feel what it must be like to go to war. Veering from euphoria to dread to hope, Billy Lynn is a propulsive story that feels real and true. With fierce and fearless writing, Fountain is a writer worth every accolade about to come his way.

Panelists: Cathy O’Connell, Fred Venrick, Steve Stunda, Donna Grauer

 

AW READS_Ocean_at_the_End_of_the_Lane_webThe Ocean at the End of the Lane
by Neil Gaiman
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The never-named fiftyish narrator is back in his childhood homeland, rural Sussex, England, where he’s just delivered the eulogy at a funeral. With “an hour or so to kill” afterward, he drives about—aimlessly, he thinks—until he’s at the crucible of his consciousness: a farmhouse with a duck pond. There, when he was seven, lived the Hempstocks, a crone, a housewife, and an 11-year-old girl, who said they were grandmother, mother, and daughter. Now, he finds the crone and, eventually, the housewife—the same ones, unchanged—while the girl is still gone, just as she was at the end of the childhood adventure he recalls in a reverie that lasts all afternoon. He remembers how he became the vector for a malign force attempting to invade and waste our world. The three Hempstocks are guardians, from time almost immemorial, situated to block such forces and, should that fail, fight them. Gaiman mines mythological typology—the three-fold goddess, the water of life (the pond, actually an ocean)—and his own childhood milieu to build the cosmology and the theater of a story he tells more gracefully than any he’s told since Stardust (1999).

Panelists: Paul Freeman, Sofia Gamba, Hannah Nilsson, Mikayla Axtell

 

AW READS_Lowland_webThe Lowland
by Jhumpa Lahiri
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Lahiri’s haunting second novel nominated for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, crosses generations, oceans, and the chasms that despair creates within families. Subhash and Udayan are brothers, 15 months apart, born in Calcutta in the years just before Indian independence and the country’s partition. As children, they are inseparable: Subhash is the elder, and the careful and reserved one; Udayan is more willful and wild. When Subhash moves to the U.S. for graduate school in the late 1960s, he has a hard time keeping track of Udayan’s involvement in the increasingly violent Communist uprising taking place throughout West Bengal. The only person who will eventually be able to tell Subhash, if not quite explain, what happened to his brother is Gauri, Udayan’s love-match wife, of whom the brothers’ parents do not approved. Forced by circumstances, Gauri and Subhash form their own relationship, one both intimate and distant, which will determine much of the rest of their adult lives.

Panel: Sara Halterman, Jill Stephens, Teige Muhlfeld

 

AW READS_Interestings_webThe Interestings
by Meg Wolitzer
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The summer that Nixon resigns, six teenagers at a summer camp for the arts become inseparable. Decades later the bond remains powerful, but so much else has changed. In The Interestings, Wolitzer follows these characters from the height of youth through middle age, as their talents, fortunes, and degrees of satisfaction diverge. The kind of creativity that is rewarded at age fifteen is not always enough to propel someone through life at age thirty; not everyone can sustain, in adulthood, what seemed so special in adolescence. Jules Jacobson, an aspiring comic actress, eventually resigns herself to a more practical occupation and lifestyle. Her friend Jonah, a gifted musician, stops playing the guitar and becomes an engineer. But Ethan and Ash, Jules’s now-married best friends, become shockingly successful—true to their initial artistic dreams, with the wealth and access that allow those dreams to keep expanding. The friendships endure and even prosper, but also underscore the differences in their fates, in what their talents have become and the shapes their lives have taken.

Panel: Mo LaMee, Jamie Kravitz, Renee Prince

 

AW READS_Radiance_of_Tomorrow_webRadiance of Tomorrow
by Ishmael Beah
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At the center of Radiance of Tomorrow are Benjamin and Bockarie, two longtime friends who return to their hometown, Imperi, after the civil war. The village is in ruins, the ground covered in bones. As more villagers begin to come back, Benjamin and Bockarie try to forge a new community by taking up their former posts as teachers, but they’re beset by obstacles: a scarcity of food; a rash of murders, thievery, rape, and retaliation; and the depredations of a foreign mining company intent on sullying the town’s water supply and blocking its paths with electric wires. As Benjamin and Bockarie search for a way to restore order, they’re forced to reckon with the uncertainty of their past and future alike.

Panel: Drew Brookhart, Jeffrey Bradley, Molly Ireland